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There were many children in the Theresienstadt camp, often segregated from the adults in children’s homes. The group of young boys who were housed in Barracks L417 (or Home One) started, in secret, to produce a newspaper, Vedem (which translates as ‘We lead’), which was a remarkable collection of essays, reviews, stories, drawings and poetry, written by the 13-, 14- and 15-year-old boys in Home One. Vedem’s first and only editor-in-chief was Petr Ginz (1928–1944), who took on the role aged 14. Vedem was produced weekly, from December 1942 to July 1944. The 800 pages of Vedem, 1–190 typewritten, the rest handwritten, survived the war and are now housed in the Memorial of Terezin. The 100 or so occupants of Home One were less fortunate; only fifteen boys survived the war. Vedem’s editor-in-chief, Petr Ginz, was murdered in Auschwitz in 1944.


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